Matching – Act Like Your Child – Plus One

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  • MATCHING – ACT LIKE YOUR CHILD – PLUS ONE

    Dr. James Mc Donald, Professor Emeritus, Speech & Language Pathology, Ohio State University

     

    Your child’s language comes from you. Consequently you need to communicate in ways that he can and take an occasional next step. Ask yourself:  am I doing what my child can try to do?  If the answer is “no” then match more closely with your child, and he will interact more. For example, if the child is using single words, match him by using single and two-word phrases.  If the child is using two-word phrases, match by using phrases and simple sentences.  Think of matching as a staircase.  If your child is on Step 2, you need to be interacting with him on Steps 2 and 3, and occasionally on Step 4.

    Try the following ways of matching:

    • Play in the way your child can play.
    • Do actions and movements he can do.
    • Make sounds he can make.
    • Talk in ways he can do.
    • Show him a feasible next step.
    • In general be a “possible” partner.
    • Do not match behavior you do not want more of.
    • Expect behaviors your child can do.
    • Avoid expecting or demanding the impossible.
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  • Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lo

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